If you’re worried about a person’s mental health, there are some behavioural changes you can look out for.

Mental health issues are a serious concern, but one that people are often reluctant to discuss. There’s a stigma associated with even the most common issues. But if you’re wondering whether a loved one has been living with a mental illness and has not sought professional health, it’s useful to be aware of certain mental health ailments and their symptoms.

Some of the most common mental health issues that occur today in children and adults are depression and anxiety. Other illnesses include Schizophrenia, Bipolar disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Children may also suffer from learning disorders, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and autism spectrum disorder also occur somewhat frequently.

If you’re worried about a person’s mental health, there are some behavioural changes you can look out for. While tension, sadness and worry are a part of life, as is grieving the death of a loved one, it’s only when the frequency and durations of these emotions fail to decrease and start to affect daily life that it can become a mental illness. Some of the signs to watch for include sudden increase or decrease in sleep or appetite, a dip in performance at work or school, bursts of irritability, loss of interest in typically enjoyable activities, feelings of worthlessness or hopelessness, or a belief they are in danger.

When discussing these problems, communication is key. Start by telling adults that you believe them, and try to convince them there’s no harm in seeing  a doctor. For children, the difficulty will come in communicating with their parents. The best course of action would be to tell them the child is having difficulty learning a subject, and a professional should be consulted before it gets worse.


Under the Mental Healthcare Act 2017, everyone is guaranteed access to mental health care in a humane manner. In extreme cases, where a person is at risk of harming themselves or others, you can move the court to make sure the person gets professional help.

Source: The News Minute

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