[The future jobs will require a workforce with the ability to think creatively and know how to execute requirements effectively.]

How do we prepare our kids for jobs we don’t even know or understand? We are still waiting for the self-driving car to start its operations, nor have we worn 3D printed clothing!

Internet of things conductor, drone manager, self-driving car mechanic and augmented reality architects – are some of the jobs that experts predict for the labour market from 2020.

The 2016 Future of Job report by the World Economic Forum said that seven million jobs will be lost due to automation. However, two million jobs will also be created.



The report highlighted that 65 per cent of children entering primary school today will end up working in completely new job profiles – ones that don’t exist yet. So, how do we prepare our kids for jobs we don’t even know or understand? We are still waiting for the self-driving car to start its operations, nor have we worn 3D printed clothing. These are technological advancements that kids of today will witness as they grow up.

The head of innovation technology at the Swiss International Scientific School, Amir Yazdanpana, believes students should be able to apply STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) skills through collaboration and innovation in order to be ready for future jobs.

“It seems beyond debate that technology will continue to increase productivity at workplaces. Technology is going to replace jobs, more precisely, people holding those jobs. But let’s also recognise that for every robot put in the world, we also need someone maintaining and taking care of it,” he said.

“The hardest activities to automate with current technologies such as AI, robotics, and blockchain are those that require creativity, imagination, decision making, strategy – technology is not great at goal-setting or even using common sense.




“The future jobs will require a workforce with the ability to think creatively and know how to effectively execute ideas, projects, products and services. Ideas will have less value compared to the past. However, the value of a person increases immensely based on their skill to transform an idea into reality. Being skilled in the STEM is important for future tactical jobs, but having the ability to apply these skills through creativity, collaboration and innovation becomes even more critical.”

Another educator said that jobs have often been replaced by technology throughout history, therefore, teachers must prepare their students for an “unpredictable future”.

“Powered by ‘exponential technologies’, a wide range of jobs are disappearing even today. It is important that, as educators, we help our students prepare for an unpredictable future,” Dr John Hughes, founding principal and CEO of GEMS Vertus School in Al Waha, said. “While predicting the future is an inexact science at best, some agreement is emerging around the growing importance of areas such as global connectivity, smart machines, new media and sustainability.”

Dr Hughes said their school is focusing on certain areas of studies to ensure their students are ready for future jobs. They have developed their curriculum with the support of the GEMS Innovation and Research Development team.



“Teachers will focus on building students’ knowledge and understanding of the subjects they study and providing opportunities for them to apply that knowledge in practical ways.

“We will help them develop the four Cs – communication, creativity, collaboration and critical thinking – vital for tomorrow’s marketplace. Whatever the changes, it is the job of schools to help develop kids become productive citizens.”

Source: Khaleej Times

 

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